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The Photo Opp Podcast – Episode 5: Photography Accounting 101 | Guest: Helena Swyter at Sweeter CPA

The Photo Opp Podcast – Photography Accounting 101 | Guest: Helena Swyter at Sweeter CPA

Photo Opp Podcast Episode 5 – Show Notes

Today’s episode of the Photo Opp Podcast is getting to the basics of accounting for photographers. We’re chatting with Helena Swyter, co-owner of Sweeter CPA, to get down to the nitty-gritty, including:

  • Business structures for photographers

  • What to consider for tax season

  • What makes a photography business unique in its finances

  • Common mistakes photographers make with their accounting

If you are a new listener to Photo Opp, I’d love to hear from you. DM me @meganbreukelman with any questions or ideas, and join the Facebook Group for meaningful discourse within the community.

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The Photo Opp Podcast – Episode 4 – Transcript

POP E05.mp3 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

POP E05.mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2020.

Megan Breukelman:
Welcome back to the Photo Opp Podcast. Today, we’re talking with Helena Swyter CPA, so welcome Helena!

Helena Swyter:
Hi! Glad to be here.

Megan Breukelman:
Thank you so much for being here. So tell us a little bit about you.

Helena Swyter:
Yes. So I’m an accountant. I live in Chicago with my husband, child and two cats. And I’ve been doing accounting. I’ve been an accountant for almost fifteen years now and I have been working for myself for the past seven of those years.

Megan Breukelman:
Wow. Well, congrats on working for yourself and taking that leap of faith with your business. That’s super exciting. How did you get started on your path overall?

Helena Swyter:
Yeah, so as I mentioned, I I’ve been an accountant for the past 15 years. I got my undergraduate degree in accounting and my master’s in taxation. So this is sort of always something I knew I wanted to do. And I immediately started working for one of the big four accounting companies. So I was doing taxation for larger companies that you would have heard of. In the meantime, I always had a more creative side, so I was writing a small blog and I’m like, really small. I don’t know that my mom was a regular reader. It was really small. And to kind of get away from them or accounting side of my life, I went to blogging conferences and others conferences. No one ever really asked me about my blog because as I said, it was fairly small. But people had a lot of questions about taxation once they found out I was an accountant. And so I’d be answering questions about how to account for when people would get money and product from a company or whether or not certain things were deductible if you were writing about them. So it finally clicked like, oh, this is what I should do, because I had previously thought that the one side of my life would be kind of creative. And once I read accounting, I never thought I’d be able to overlap the two. But once I realized that there was a need there for those services, I jumped right in.

Megan Breukelman:
And what kind of services do you do at Sweeter CPA?

Helena Swyter:
The big one that everyone thinks of when they think of an accountant is taxes, of course. So we do annual taxes, the ones that are due in April and March depending on your business. That’s probably the main time of year that people think about their accountant. But beyond that, we help with other taxes that are due at other times that the year, such as quarterly estimate of taxes and sales tax and then, of course, consulting as people are getting started or growing or just starting a new business venture with a friend and need to understand the tax implications or how they should be setup legally or what they should be doing and short to make sure that those tax returns we do in March and April aren’t a terrible surprise. And then beyond that, we offer bookkeeping, both set up to help people get started on using a system that works for them and also help maintaining it, just making sure either us maintaining it or us checking in regularly to make sure that things are still looking good and nothing has gotten too far off the track.

Megan Breukelman:
And you’re working with your husband as well? Yeah. Tell me a little bit about that dynamic.

Helena Swyter:
That’s probably one of the biggest questions I get. Actually, because a lot of people are working at this spelling. It’s a yeah, I got a lot of questions about working with a spouse. But as I dive more into creative businesses, I’ve always been in this field. But you find that there are quite a lot of small businesses that start this way. So it’s typically people who aren’t involved in small business who are kind of boggles the mind. But as I mentioned earlier, we have a child. She just turned four in December. And the biggest thing that it gives us working for ourselves is flexibility because we answer to one another so someone can always go pick up the kid if she gets sick or if there’s, you know, the random holidays that kids have off from preschool, that kind of stuff. So we have so much flexibility to be there with our daughter when we aren’t working. Currently it’s tax season and it’s a little more rigid, but in general, more flexibility for the kid. And we do I mean, we do spend a lot of time together because we are home together. And then we just rented an office and we’re there together all day. So there’s a lot of together time, but we’ve got our roles within the business pretty well-defined. And I’m the CPA and he is the tech person and he’s the one that has really mastered the different bookkeeping systems so he can answer people’s questions there. So I think it helps that we each have an area of relative expertise within the business. And it is also, of course, nice to be able to have your spouse, who for many of us also want to be best friends, to be able to talk about work or help bounce ideas off of like should I expanded do this? What do you think about that thing? How did I sound on that presentation, whatever it is, and get some feedback that way.

Megan Breukelman:
That’s so great. And I completely understand, like the biggest question I get from people who aren’t working in small business like, oh my God, how do you work with your spouse? I’ve been there, but that’s so great that you guys balance each other out and you’ve really found a system that works for you both.

Helena Swyter:
Yeah, we definitely have.

Megan Breukelman:
So I definitely want to know a little more about working with creatives because you said you’re kind of blending your creative side with your accounting business and you’re working with a lot of creatives on their finances. So how
did you get started working with creative freelancers?

Helena Swyter:
So as I mentioned, I really got the idea for the company at a blog conference. I was literally being asked Haq’s questions and I thought of the tagline, I’m type A, you’re type awesome. And as I could do something with this. So that’s who started pretty much. But I’ve always found there’s a certain passion there with work. With creative entrepreneurs, because a lot of people that I help out are people who are building a career out of something they’re passionate about or something that they never honestly thought could be a career. So someone who maybe enjoyed lettering and letter work and then realized that there was a market for calligraphy or lettering on invitations and whatnot, or someone who always loved to do watercolor and then realized they could sell their paintings, that kind of thing. So it’s exciting for me to watch people turn things that were passions or side gigs or side hustles into something that’s sustainable and their full time job. So there’s always that kind of excitement there. And also, I think people are more excited about their jobs. So they’re excited to learn what’s going on. To understand how to make the numbers work and how to you know, they’re really passion about making it into a full time career. So there’s a lot of interest on both sides that I find very exciting to work with.

Megan Breukelman:
And I want to get down to the nitty gritty with photography, since this is, you know, photography forecasts. Can you tell us a bit about the common structures of a photography business?

Helena Swyter:
Sure. So the three most common structures really for any small business are the sole proprietor, the LLC and something called an S corporation, a sole proprietor is just the default categorization. So if you are out there in the world earning money as something other than someone else’s employee, you are by default a sole proprietor. So people will come to me and they say like, oh, I haven’t really started a business yet. And I always say, well, congrats, you actually have your sole proprietor. That’s the default. If you don’t elect anything else by default, you’re a sole proprietor. So it’s definitely the easiest one to set up because you just have to go out there and make money. But there are some drawbacks as well with it being with you in the business, being legally the same entities. So there’s some potential issues should you run into litigation or business debts. So one of the things that people do to protect themselves is form an LLC and an LLC stands for limited liability company. So as the name implies, you’re limiting your personal liability for business debts. So this isn’t going to help you in the case of fraud or negligence. But assuming that all of your listeners are upright people, it will create a separate legal entity for your business. So in the case of potential litigation or business debts, you’ve legally separated the things you own personally and that your business owns. So if for tax purposes, it’s very similar to the sole proprietorship. But what we’ve done is create a separate legal entity just to protect yourself legally from any liability issues. And l-l sees are state run entities. So you register with the state, which means that every state has a different process. Some are more intensive than others and some are more expensive than others. In most states, it’s something you can do yourself online. There’s not really a need to go through a lawyer that said, of course, if you would prefer to go through a lawyer by all means. That’s definitely something you can do. But in most cases, it’s just a form you fill out and it’s fairly simple. It’s a way for the state to get your money for the joy of working in whatever state you happen to live in. So that would be something you’d look at either your secretary of state’s Web site or state treasurers Web site. There’ll be information there. And most states have entity formation guides on their state Web sites because they want to help you form a business in their state because, of course, they want to have more business in their state. So another option from there that people look at typically when they’re making more money just because of the additional requirements is something called an S corporation. And S-Corp does have the potential to save you on something called self-employment tax. But it does have additional requirements. You would have to pay yourself a salary through payroll. It has its own standalone tax return. So there are definite benefits, but there are drawbacks as well. So you’ll want to talk to an accountant just to make sure you understand how the numbers would flow through and how you would potentially save money on taxes. While I mentioned that you could probably set up an LLC by yourself if you are motivated, I definitely do not recommend setting up your own corporation because that’s where I see a lot of errors. So definitely speak to an accountant before you set up an S-Corp just to make sure you understand all the requirements and you are good to go with everything you need to be doing and other things that make a photography business unique when it comes down to their finances compared to other kinds of creative businesses. One of the things that photographers need to keep in mind is sales tax. And with photography specifically, especially with things like wedding photography, photographers tend to offer packages. They’ll have like let’s say three levels of packages or coverage at like a wedding. And it will include. Hours, day of and one album in two prints or something like that. And in cases like that, where we’re creating a package that mixes services and physical goods, the services being your time at the wedding and the physical goods being that either the album or the prints or whatever you’re handing off at the end, you need to make sure to separate out on your invoices what you are charging for. So you attach the sales tax to the physical goods only. So in that case, you might have an invoice that had three line items. So X number of hours at the wedding, one album, two prints, and then just make sure it’s clear on the invoice that you’re charging sales tax on the album and the prints only or you can create packages that don’t mix services and physical goods. I just know that especially in the wedding industry, those are more common. But in those cases we just want to make sure that our invoices are clear. So it’s clear which parts of the package are physical good and which part are services so that you can charge sales tax properly. So that’s one thing that I think is unique to photography, specifically because there aren’t a lot of other industries where you are creating those types of packages that might mix those things.

Megan Breukelman:
That’s a really good point. And I’m thinking about all the photographers who are missing those things and not considering that. How can a photographer get educated on what they need to be charging for their sales taxes or any other kind of taxes?

Helena Swyter:
Sure. One thing I definitely recommend that photographers look into in their specific state is what the rules are on digital products. So in most jurisdictions, sales tax is only charged on what’s called tangible goods, which means something that you can hold in your hand. Like if I go to the gap and I buy a sweater, they’re going to charge me sales tax. But the whole world of digital goods is s
till a little grey. And so some jurisdictions of some states or local taxing authorities charge for digital products. So you’ll just want to make sure that in your area, if what you are presenting as a final product is access to digital products, make sure that that is not taxable. One thing I find people do that kind of sets the burden to someone else is go through a third party printing service. So if you are handling the prints in-house, then there are sales sexual clients. So if you’ve done like let’s say you’ve done a family session, you’ve given them a gallery of 100 images and they pick 20 that they want prints of who is doing that printing. If you’re doing it in-house, there’s sales tax requirements that you need to be collecting and sending into the state. But I know a lot of photographers go through third party services where they are printed elsewhere and shipped to the client. And in that case, those third party printers would be handling the sales tax. So that’s a way to kind of shift the burden to someone else, should you, especially if you’re not doing prints very often. I know nowadays a lot of people are selling prints, of course, but nowadays a lot of people are really into their digital galleries for sharing on Facebook and Instagram and whatnot. So looking at third party printers is a good way to avoid sales tax if it’s not a huge part of your business. Beyond that, I just say to be sure, you’re looking at the area in which you’re working. So in a lot of cases, this is run by the state. So your state will have asset sales tax rate, but in certain areas, certain states have local tax authorities like California does. Ohio does. Just make sure you’re looking at the proper authority for you. So does your state have local taxes as well? In that case, you’ll want to make sure to look at the local tax website. So either the secretary of state, the county clerk, these are the types of websites or you’ll find this information for. Of course, you can reach out to an accountant who I’m sure would be happy to help put you in the right direction.

Megan Breukelman:
And even with photographers who are selling digital files for examples that they should be looking into what their state says as well, right?

Helena Swyter:
Yes, absolutely. It’s always good to check. As I mentioned, in most jurisdictions, digital files are not considered a taxable product, but some states are different, of course, just to keep us on our toes. So just make sure that you’ve checked your local jurisdiction to make sure that you know the appropriate answer for you. And this is one of those things where if you’re in especially like a nationwide organization and someone else says, like what? I’ve never charged sales tax for that. It’s irrelevant potentially if they live in a different state. So do your own research, ask an accountant or check your own local tax jurisdiction. Don’t just rely on what other people you know are doing. Unless they literally live in your exact same space, then they might be a good resource. But just be sure to do your own research on what is taxable in your area.

Megan Breukelman:
And since we’re on the topic of taxes, I want to get more specific. Are there any specific taxes to photographers like sales tax, for example, that need to be considered when tax season rolls around?

Helena Swyter:
Sure. A question I get a lot with photographers is people who take deposits in a year that’s different from the photo shoot. So this is especially common with larger events like weddings. You might book someone this year for a wedding that’s not taking place until next year. So there’s a deposit to be paid. So depending on what method of accounting you’re using, you may have to claim that income in the year it was received. So most small businesses are using something called the cash method of accounting. And I won’t get too granular. I promise there won’t be a quiz at the end. But in this case, you would record that money when it was received. So if you got a deposit this year, even though you’re not doing the wedding and getting the rest of the money until next year, you would need to record that on your taxes as income for this year. Some people are on the accrual method of accounting. It’s a little more rare for small businesses and those people maybe do something differently. So reach out to an accountant if you are unclear on which method you are using. But for most people, just remember that even if the wedding is next year, if you’ve got money this year, you’re most likely reporting it this year. And with that, I tell people to have something in their contracts about what happens if a wedding is cancelled. If you do have to turn a part of a deposit and you’ve already reported on your taxes, you would be able to deduct it in the future year. So don’t worry about reporting it and then getting hosed if a wedding is cancelled. But just be sure to have something in your contract about how much of that deposit is refundable and then let your accountant know and you can deduct it from your income in the future year. Another thing that all small creative businesses need to be aware of is quarterly estimated taxes. For this, I tell people that if they’ve ever worked for someone else. If you’ve ever been an employee, you’ve seen that as you earn money, as your paycheck is deposited into your bank account. You see that taxes are withheld. So whoever your employer is is taking money out of your paycheck to send to the state and the IRS when you work for yourself. No one is doing. So you need to be aware of it. Throughout the year and sending money into the IRS and your state and potentially even your local tax jurisdiction four times a year. So rather than having an enormous lump sum of taxes due in April, which, you know, no one enjoys paying four times a year, one because the IRS requires it. And that will help you avoid penalties. But two is definitely a lot easier to see your taxes in four chunks rather than all in one big chunk at the end of the year. So it kind of helps people avoid the shock and dismay at tax time. So if you are unfamiliar with estimated taxes or if you’re new perhaps to being your own small business, that’s something you either look into or reach out to an accountant about. But just keep in mind that the IRS wants to see your money throughout the year. It doesn’t want to wait until April to get a big check from you. It wants money out there so it can continue its operations so you’ll have to pay in quarterly. And beyond that, honestly, and one of the things I see with any small business is people not charging what they’re worth. And that’s probably a whole other topic of conversation. And I’m sure you’ll have other guests on that. But just be aware, as someone who is self-employed that you owe taxes on this money. You owe the Social Security and Medicare tax on this money, and you’ve worked hard to learn about your craft. So just be sure to charge what you’re worth because that obviously, if you’re not charging what you’re worth, it’s gonna be a slower road to this potentially being a full time job. So just keep that in mind. And, you know, what is that saying? Like, know your worth, then add tax. So just be sure that you are charging enough to make a living off of this if that is what your goal is.

Megan Breukelman:
I love that. Know your worth. And then add tax. That’s so clever. So I guess you’ve kind of dug into it a little bit, but do you have any other kind of
common mistakes that photographers are making with their finances?

Helena Swyter:
Sure. One of the smaller things. But when photographers frequently will sell off old parts, they don’t need anymore. So they’ve got an old camera bodies say, or they try to lens and they hate it or something when they sell that off. If they bought it with business funds, then when they sell it to some other photographer who may want well, obviously if the other photographers buying it, there’s a half who wants it. But if they’re selling it to someone else, that money would be business income since they purchased the asset originally with business funds. So just keep in mind, if you are someone who kind of sells off old backdrops or whatever, that that’s taxable income to you if you purchase it originally with business funds. And then beyond that, I find that some of the more common issues for small business are just keeping track of all the expenses. And I know we’re going to dive into this in a second, but one of the most common errors I find with any. Well, business is just forgetting about expenses. And then, of course, we can’t write them off on your tax return if you’ve forgotten about the money that you spent, so just keeping good records to be sure to keep track of all the expenses that you have for your business.

Megan Breukelman:
Yes. So in terms of expenses and just kind of financial health overall, do you have any specific software recommendations or apps or anything like that for photographers who really are trying to get on track with their finances?

Helena Swyter:
Sure. So the four bookkeeping, I definitely recommend online bookkeeping systems. And this just means that it’s a system that you’d access via the Internet. The data lives on the cloud versus the more old school approach of it being like a CDO that you load on your computer and it lives there. So the three options that I like the best in order are QuickBooks Online wav and zero and zero is spelled x e r o because they want me to always have to spell it every time I recommend recommended to people. So those are probably the top three online bookkeeping recommendations that I would have the benefit to. Online bookkeeping is that you can link your business bank account and business credit cards so that whenever anything happens, whenever any kind of income or expense happens, it is brought over automatically into your bookkeeping system. So for instance, if you go to Office Depot and spend $30 on printer paper, you charge it on the business card, of course, because you’re keeping everything separate. When you log into your books, you’ll see a $30 expense that Office Depot and you just categorize that as office supplies and you’re good to go. So that avoids you forgetting about it or you miss typing it, which is something I find a lot of people start out with Excel, which is totally valid place to start. But one of the errors that people have there is still mistype a number invert two numbers and then their books are like three dollars off and they can’t figure it out and they’re pulling the hair out. So if they’re like me, they’re in there. So this just keeps everything kind of on. That makes the computers work so you don’t have to accidentally overlook something. And those will also allow you to run reports throughout the year. So, for instance, you can run a profit and loss statement and you’d be able to see immediately how your business is doing. And that’ll definitely really help for quarterly estimated tax calculations. And in addition to those and those three, I believe, have apps on your phone as well that will allow you to do what I’m about to describe. But in case you’re using other systems expensive, I will allow you to take pictures with your phone of a receipt and then categorize it to your expense system. So that’s a good one just to keep track of different receipts if you are someone who is dealing with a lot of paper receipts. I know I personally don’t really keep anything paper or have it either scanned or photographed or something. Just so I don’t have the literal piece of paper so expensive. I will help you do that and avoid that. The proverbial shoe box full of receipts that you hear about and another app that helps people, especially those who are traveling a lot for shoots and whatnot is Meile IQ and my like. He was an app on your phone just to keep track of the miles that you’re driving in your personal car. And so if you’re driving a lot for business to different shoot locations or to maybe a class or, you know, to meet up with other photographers to discuss current photography trends or whatever, just keeping track of those miles to be able to deduct them. People tend to forget about miles and miles. Q We’ll track it in real time and that’ll prevent you at the entity from having to go back through your calendar appointments and, you know, Google Maps and try to figure out like how far away was that field? It’ll just keep track of all that stuff for you.

Megan Breukelman:
And speaking of bookkeeping and kind of keeping track of everything, I want to take a step back for photographers who may just be starting to figure all this stuff out. At what point should they consider getting a separate business bank account?

Helena Swyter:
So I would recommend as soon as they realize that this isn’t a hobby, that this is something that they would like to pursue for money, even if they don’t make money in that first year, which is totally common at that point, they should have a separate bank account. It just makes things easier to keep as separate from the start. We can, of course, separate things later. If you know, people sometimes things get away from them or they don’t realize that this was gonna be a lucrative endeavor and we can pull things right and separate them later. But it’s just a lot easier if you keep it separate from the start and it can be a separate personal bank account. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a business bank account if you’re still kind of toying around with the idea of whether or not this is something you want to dive into. But keeping things separate from the start and keeping organized from the start will just make your future a whole lot easier.

Helena Swyter:
And at what point should they consider getting a CPA?

Megan Breukelman:
So I would recommend anyone who is an S corporation. So one of the entities you spoke about earlier always be working with an accountant. Just because there are a lot more moving pieces there and. Can be a little more complex to make sure that you’re filing everything and meeting all the requirements. So if you are an s corporation, I hope you spoke with an accountant to get that set up. And I hope you have a good relationship with an accountant going for it just to make sure that you are getting everything in on time and getting everything filed as needed. But the other entities, I, of course, work with people at any stage of business and many other accountants I know do as well. But frankly, if you have the time, the inclination and the interest, the IRS, of course, wants you to be able to file your tax return properly. And there are plenty of really good products out there, like TurboTax has a small business software package. I believe a lot of them, like H&R BLOCK online sort of software packages, have a small business option. So if you
do have the inclination to do it yourself, there are plenty of resources out there to help you. What a CPA can provide is not necessarily hidden information that you wouldn’t have otherwise, but just time and certainty because I’m sure I can do the return more quickly than you can and an answer. And that gives you more time to do other things that you perhaps like more than looking up like the thresholds or schedule, S.E. or whatever. So you would get to focus on your passions versus taxes and less taxes are your passions, in which case welcome to the club. But the CPA gives you the time to not be doing your turn. And the certainty that it is filed by someone who is an expert in that area. So as you have questions, if you get to the end result and it’s not great, you can ask about how you can make next year better. You could talk to your CPA about, you know, when different changes throughout the year if you need to be paying more incredibly estimated taxes. If you know, if you change packages, should you be charging sales tax, that sort of thing. So the CPA really just gives you the confidence to grow knowing that someone else is taking care of the numbers.

Megan Breukelman:
If those especially those aren’t your your thing and I feel like I have so many more questions, but I do want to be mindful of your time. So I guess my final big question is, do you have any other advice for photographers who are building their businesses?

Helena Swyter:
Yeah, absolutely. Any systems you can set in place now to get yourself organized are definitely going to pay dividends going forward. It’s a lot easier to to advise and to help on with tax returns when people have things separate and organized. Of course, I I see a lot of people who don’t have separate and organized in every account. Also, we’ll see people whose stuff is not as organized. So never be concerned that you don’t have your stuff in order enough to speak to an accountant. But just as you get started, especially as you’re initially building up your contacts and your income, just keeping everything separate, so your business bank account that you’re all the business income is going into and the expenses are coming out of just helps you from an organizational perspective and helps you have a good idea. How much profit you’ve made, which is, of course, important for tax time. So those steps so keeping things organized. And then I find that people frequently forget what they did with cash. So I tell people to avoid cash, if at all possible. People will take withdrawals from a bank account and source. I’ll just see like each and large all $200 and I’ll ask them like, okay, on March 7th, you withdraw $200. You know what you did with it and no one remembers. So it’s just easier unless you’re a very good record taker at the time. It’s easier if you used a business credit card, a debit card, because then we have the statement that says like, oh, you were at PNH photo and you. And then you could find the receipt and realized you bought like a backdrop or something versus cash where, you know, once it’s gone, we really don’t know what happened to it. So keeping separate, avoid using cash if possible, just because it adds another layer of things you need to keep track of.

Megan Breukelman:
Wow. Well, this has lightly blown my mind. Thank you so much for all of this amazing information. And tell us where our listeners can find you, because I’m sure there are people listening who definitely want to know, look you up and seek out some advice.

Helena Swyter:
Absolutely. So my website is sweeter CPA dot com. So s. W e t e r CPA dot com. And you’ll find all our contact information on there. We’re located in Chicago, but we work with people worldwide. So it doesn’t matter where you are. As long as Uncle Sam wants some of your money, we can help you figure that out.

Megan Breukelman:
Perfect. Well, thank you so much. And do you have like an Instagram or Twitter or anything like that?

Helena Swyter:
My Instagram is mostly pictures of my daughter and cat. But you’re right. If that’s your thing, it’s Helena h e l e n a s w e t. Although you’re not could glean a whole lot of tax knowledge them there. But my text, my cats are very cute and my Twitter is sweet or CPA. So her name is the website. Yeah. And any phone numbers, email addresses are on the website. So if you can get there, you get all the other contact info.

Megan Breukelman:
Perfect. Well, thank you so much. This has been really great and they really appreciate you taking the time.

Helena Swyter:
Of course. Thanks for having me. Thank you.

Megan Breukelman:
Thanks so much for tuning into the photo op podcast. If you liked this episode, I’d love for you to leave your view and let me know what you liked and what you want to hear more of. Also, head on over to the Facebook community and participate in some conversation with fellow photographers. If you want to reach me directly, feel free to DM me at Megan Breukelman which is linked in the show notes as well. Thanks again for listening. And I’ll see you in a flash.

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2/05/2020

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The Photo Opp Podcast – Episode 5: Photography Accounting 101 | Guest: Helena Swyter at Sweeter CPA

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