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The Photo Opp Podcast – Episode 4: Film Wedding Photography, Diversifying Income and More | Guest: Kate Ignatowski at Locust Collection

The Photo Opp Podcast – Film Wedding Photography, Diversifying Income and More | Guest: Kate Ignatowski at Locust Collection

Photo Opp Podcast Episode 4 – Show Notes

Today’s episode of the Photo Opp Podcast covers SO much exciting stuff, from shooting weddings on film, to prop styling, to diversifying your income as a photographer. Wedding photographer and founder of the Locust Collection, Kate Ignatowski, dives into the nitty-gritty of what it took to start her own business beyond her own photography, and pursuing projects that matter personally. Quick talking points include:

  • Shooting film photography for weddings

  • The importance of prop styling for wedding photographers

  • Diversifying your income stream as a photographer

If you are a new listener to Photo Opp, I’d love to hear from you. DM me @meganbreukelman with any questions or ideas, and join the Facebook Group for meaningful discourse within the community.

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The Photo Opp Podcast – Episode 4 – Transcript

POP E04.mp3 transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

POP E04.mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2020.

Megan Breukelman:
Welcome back to the photo op podcast. Today, we’re talking with photographer and founder of the Locust Collection Kate Ignatowski! So welcome, Kate.

Kate Ignatowski:
Thanks, Megan. I’m so happy to be talking with you today.

Megan Breukelman:
I’m so happy you’re here. So tell our listeners a little about you. How did you get started with photography?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. I had a job after college. I was working as an engineer. And soon after my own wedding, my husband was offered an opportunity to move to Australia. And we obviously did that because you trust you when you can. And we just wanted the opportunity to live in a different country and explore. But that meant that I had to quit my job in engineering and I ended up getting a job in Australia. But I did not really love it. But in it, trying to meet new friends, I joined the photography club at that company. Was a tech company. It was all guys. They were super geeked out on the technical aspects of photography and they really taught me everything. Everything just clicked from there. At that point, photography was more of a hobby for me and I kind of thought I knew what I was doing, but I I definitely didn’t until then. And then when we left, Australia moved back to the US. We moved to New York and I just threw everything into my photography business there, started doing weddings. So that’s kind of how I got started with photography and do primarily do weddings. I do primarily do weddings. I do some family shoots. I do often. It’s just like a newborn shoot for past wedding clients. And to be honest, I love doing family shoots and I love doing especially newborn shoots. But I just have found and we can probably talk about this more, but I’ve just found to have very limited time and to grow a newborn and family business, I think would just be a whole different thing to have to market. And I thought about it a lot and I just don’t have the time to do that right now.

Megan Breukelman:
And that’s totally fair. And you’re primarily a film photographer, right?

Kate Ignatowski:
Yes.

Megan Breukelman:
So what kind of inspired that decision in the age of digital photography?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. You know, when I’m moved to New York and was starting my photography business, I was doing digital. But I found that I was really drawn to all these images that I saw from different photographers. And the one thing in common was they were all films. So I thought, well, I mean, I can I can try that. So I remember as the winter, I bought myself a contacts medium format film camera and I went out walking around Central Park and I shot my first roll of film and I just fell in love with the process of it. I was amazed that any of the pictures I got back on that first roll were actually good. So the look of it, just the process, a lot less images. You have to shoot with a lot of intention. You have to know what you’re doing in the moment instead of just clicking a lot and hoping something works out. I really like the the easier workflow I found as I integrated it into my wedding work. I never liked editing digital photos, even when I was shooting weddings with my digital equipment. I was outsourcing that editing. So this was just really like the next step and it was giving me the look that I wanted. So to me, everybody has their their own approach. I don’t think any way’s better than the other, but this just really fit for me.

Megan Breukelman:
And I love the idea of taking it slow and being really intentional with your photography work. Like you said, can you kind of talk about your style a little bit?

Kate Ignatowski:
I think that my style really mimics probably my personality or parts of my personality. I really like things to be less busy. I have a very minimal approach, but I also, even when I was shooting with digital was something that’s really important to me is emotion in capturing that. I’ve never been one to you know, I can’t just be a pretty picture. It has to evoke some type of emotion for me. So creating that emotion between my couples or just noticing emotional events happening or unfolding that release sparks of passion for me. And I hope that comes through in my style as well.

Megan Breukelman:
And I would love to know about your equipment setup because film photography. I have not done since college. And I’m so curious as to what you’re shooting with and kind of what your whole equipment setup looks like.

Kate Ignatowski:
So it’s always evolving, to be honest. But primarily I have. Contact’s 645. It’s a medium format film camera and have an 80 millimeter lens, which for anybody that doesn’t know, it’s kind of equivalent to a 50 millimeter lens on a 35 millimeter camera. I also have the forty five millimeter lens, which would be equivalent to like a thirty five millimeter width. That’s great for I probably use that for maybe honestly like 5 percent of the wedding day, but I have found that that I really need it in that 5 percent of the time for like tight spaces or just trying to get like a full reception setup or something like that. With the Hasselblad. You could say X-1 D. It’s a it’s actually a digital medium format. Camera. And I honestly loved it. It’s never going to replace film for me. I kind of sometimes wish it would. But just for those in-between moments, for context, I have to. Or any film camera. You know, you have to be like metering everything perfectly. And sometimes I honestly do. Did feel like I would miss moments. I also have a Nikon 35mm film camera, which I’ve used for those in-between moments to just like I said it on Aperture Priority and just click. And it’s more about getting the moment than having this picture perfect film image. But I’m I guess I’m always trying different things. I’m always tryin
g to to figure out the best way to capture a wedding you’re in like nine years in. But so either I use a digital camera first, those in-between moments that film I just wouldn’t get. I feel like film is better, but I’d rather get it did not get it. If that makes sense.

Megan Breukelman:
No, that’s totally fair. Especially with weddings.

Kate Ignatowski:
Yes, things happen really quickly or you know, I just had a couple weddings in November that the sunset before 5 p.m. there was a lot of the wedding was inside for one of them and film. It just wasn’t going to capture the lighting. You know, if I don’t have control of the lighting, then I’m not going to shoot film just because it’s filmed. Well, I’ll integrate digital with a lot of black and white film or use the 35mm film camera. The cool thing about the 35mm film camera is that I can use all my Nikon digital lenses. So it’s a cool way to integrate film into your work because it’s I mean I think I pay like one hundred dollars for that 35mm film camera. It doesn’t to me look anything as good as a medium format. But you know, for me I shoot my own kids with a 35mm film camera a lot. If you don’t want the preciousness of the medium format and focusing it manually, you just want to have two toddlers. They move really quickly. So I need out of it.

Megan Breukelman:
That’s fair. And I just want to go back to what you said about lighting. Are you using a lot of natural light with film or are you mixing artificial light? What is your lighting setup like?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. Yes, I am mostly using natural light when it’s available. If I can control the lighting like of a brighter groom is getting ready in a room and there is a lot of natural light, I’ll turn off all the artificial light. And if it’s possible to put my hand, if it’s like a reception and I’m I have to take the detail photos and there’s just no light then. And I do want it on film. I can pop my Nikon speed light onto my contacts and bounce light. And actually, it turns out really great. It’s it’s not as good as natural light, but it still does turn out nicely. So to answer your question, you know, 90 percent of the time I’m shooting with natural light. If it’s available and controlling the light as much as possible, if it’s inside by turning off the lights and then I’m bouncing white with my speed light in like a darker reception room, I do have the giant lights that I can put on the stand and I have radio triggers that I’ve used at receptions. But I really only bring those to a wedding if it’s like a giant reception room where I feel like bouncing light is just not going to be enough.

Megan Breukelman:
That makes sense. And I feel also that like film photography is so natural and so organic. And when you bring artificial lighting into it, it may not feel the same.

Kate Ignatowski:
I agree. It doesn’t feel the same, but you still can make it work and it can still look nice. But my preference is always natural light.

Megan Breukelman:
And how do you find the film impacts your shooting process and your overall editing process? I know we talked about being slower and intentional, but I just want to dive into editing a little more.

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. So I find that, you know, with film and shooting a wedding, the work is done upfront. You have to really know what you’re doing. I feel like I have to be thinking a lot more shooting film on a wedding day than when I was shooting digital. But then you’re you’re pretty much done. You know, I get this film scans back. They look great. I take out the bad ones. I do a little cropping. I barely do any exposure or color adjustment to the film scans. And then I’m done. I mean, it’s so quick. I love that part about it. In. You know, if you’re thinking about your time and how valuable it is to me, that’s an argument for the cost of shooting film. I think it probably ends up canceling each other out. One thing too about the process is that I do need an assistant on the wedding day to roll the film. That’s just a personal thing. I’ve done a wedding without an assistant and I rolled all my film and there was just too much for me. So I prefer to have somebody there that’s always rolling the film. I have basically a couple inserts in a couple camera back. So I have, you know, different. I always have like the assistant take out a roll when it’s done. And they have already rolled a fresh roll and they just give me the new insert. So it’s just a matter of seconds between roles. And I just know they’re carrying all the bag. The bag of film, which is obviously extremely valuable and important in that would be I feel like too much for me to to do.

Megan Breukelman:
Fair enough. And I want to know, what would you tell other photographers who are considering shooting film for their business?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. I think that if you want to shoot film and you need to transition quickly and and go all in. I think a digital portfolio and a film portfolio, it looks different. And I think clients can tell. So if you are showing a digital portfolio, but then you shoot film on the wedding day, that can be confusing. I think that if you’re showing film and then you’re shooting digital, that’s also maybe confusing or misleading. So I think work as quickly as possible to transition your portfolio to or whatever it is you’re shooting if you’re going to just shoot maybe portraits on film. The rest of the Dan digital show that work quickly to have all your portraits be filmed in the rest of the wedding, be digital. But what I tell people is to just go all in. Just quickly do the whole wedding on film. One thing I I took a year basically to transition. I think that was too long. I wish I had done it a little quicker. What I did was each part of the wedding day. I added more of it on film. So like the first wedding of the season, I did that details on film and the rest on digital. The next one, I did the details and getting ready on film and the rest digital. So I think that was kind of stressful actually because like I had to have all my digital equipment. I had to remember like what I shot on film when I shot on digital. And I feel like I had what what I needed to shoot the whole wedding on film. But I wish I had had all those weddings that had done that year on films that could show them all my portfolio. Does that make sense?

Megan Breukelman:
Totally. And that’s really smart. Just the idea of going all in and really like putting it out there so you’re not making a slow, slow transition. I like you a.

Kate Ignatowski:
You know, with film to just slow down and breathe, I think that it is overwhelming to transition in a wedding day is already stressful. But, you know, you can’t make any mistakes with films. So don’t rush. Don’t stress yourself out. Maybe give your clients an extra hour or whatever in their coverage so that you don’t f
eel stressed and you can have that time to think and be careful and not make any mistakes.

Megan Breukelman:
And do you see any common mistakes amongst photographers who are jumping into film photography?

Kate Ignatowski:
I think it’s really that that’s not going all in. I see people yet maybe shoot like their own style shoe on film because that’s a more comfortable setting. But then they’re like maybe too afraid to do it at a real wedding. But again, your portfolio will be all over the place if you do that. So the biggest mistake, I think. Is not going all in. Or just deciding, you know, I’m only going to do portraits going forward on film and that would be fine, too. But like. Decide what you’re gonna do and do it.

Megan Breukelman:
And switching gears a little bit, I want to talk about the locust collection. So what is it? Let’s fill in our listeners.

Kate Ignatowski:
Ok, let’s see. Lucas Collection is my online shop where I sell styling goods for a wedding industry creative. So photographers, planners, florists. What makes it different is that everything is very thoughtfully designed to be travel friendly. And I always use the finest textiles so that my clients that use my products, they can elevate their brand. So that is what it is in a nutshell. A made products are a Rollerball styling surface. I’ve grown it now is the product that I launched the company with and I have since added a backdrop in some other other things. But everything is travel friendly with fine tech staff. And what inspired you to launch a styling company? I didn’t set out to launch a sailing company. What happened was I was traveling almost every weekend or weddings. I kind of accidentally became a destination wedding photographer. As I mentioned, I started my career in New York. And then I I moved to Richmond and then now I’m in Raleigh. But since I had that base in New York, I was just still getting increase in bookings for New York and to the point where almost all my weddings were there or other places. So I was traveling. I did two wedding seasons pregnant, one or two wedding seasons with a little baby at home. I felt like a strain on my family. So I felt like what happened was I was looking for something else. I kind of had that space in my mind that I was hoping to fill my income with something else that didn’t require as much travelling, but I just didn’t know what that was. And then in parallel, I felt like I didn’t know how to travel with a styling board. I guess I’m just a really minimal traveler. I don’t like to check bags. I don’t really like to have to care. I felt like I’m already carrying a lot. So I just kind of had it on my to do list one winter off season to try to make something for myself, like try to make us something travel friendly for myself. And I started just like tinkering. I had so many ideas, like they’re kind of laughable. Now, looking back, but the point was that I just kind of quickly became obsessed and I probably at some point realized this could be my other thing that I could fill, replace some of my income and not have to travel as much. So I think those two ideas merged. And I I really just went down this rabbit hole of trying to figure this out. I was pretty obsessed. There is probably like a two month period where it’s really all I thought about. I don’t think I slept or eat much. I just was completely determined to figure out a way to make a really nice, travel friendly styling service. I had eight ideas and ways to make it with something that was maybe like not as good material. It would have been easier to not use linen. I mean, linen is like the hardest textile. It’s so wrinkly and wrinkled so easily. But to me, like it had it had to be linen. It had to be really nice and had to be child friendly. So at some point I figured it out and that’s when I launched the lucas’ collection.

Megan Breukelman:
I really loved that this came out of such a personal place for you. And you’re putting so much of your taste as a creative into it, because I feel like when I look at your work, I see a lot of people trying to achieve what I think you have accomplished in your wedding photography, and it really reflects on your brand itself. Can we talk a little bit about kind of your process and how you launched Locust?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. It was really I’m really like a hands on developer. It’s not the cheapest way to develop things, but it’s the only way for me. So can I start with a need and then brainstorm ideas and then develop the product? And then once I had it and I was ready to launch. I it really kind of happened. You know what, it was the product needed to be there in the market. So once it was available and word got out, it just honestly it spread very organically. I don’t have any business background, but I have spent a lot of time in the last year and a half trying to educate myself on all this. And I learned what it’s called is product market fit? And I had this product market fit basically right from the get go. It was that the market needed this product and people kind of instantly understood what it was and how it was going to help them. So I started Shopify Web site. I started an Instagram account. I gave some samples, really probably only to three or four wedding photographers that I knew and trusted. And they posted, you know, about it. Not quickly help get the word out. But, you know, I didn’t send that many out. I think I probably would have if I could make the product faster. At the time. But I was pretty limited because at that time I was making the surfaces myself. And it was a really time consuming process and quite a perfectionist. So, you know, I could spend two hours making a surface and then find one small thing wrong about it. And I would toss it or cycle it. So oh, no, I think I’m kind of going into maybe more detailed in that question, but that’s sort of the how things got started. And the locust collection is kind of perfect for a still life imagery and kind of light and airy and romantic style of wedding photography.

Megan Breukelman:
So I want to talk about prop styling a little bit because I see more and more as things like flatlay style images become increasingly popular. But styling is a really important trait for photographers to be learning about. So can you talk a little bit about why styling actually matters?

Kate Ignatowski:
Yes. To me, it’s very simple. The biggest reason is that it can help your work get featured on blogs or magazines. They’re always going to require for a wedding image of the stationery or maybe like a clean photo or the cake or the gift basket. And for those things, if it’s a really beautiful wedding, you want these images that you would create to be in line with the wedding or, you know, you just want to elevate the imagery so that blogs or magazines want to feature it. And their goal is to get more eyes on their features. So anything that’s going to be pinned more or get more interaction on Instagram is going to be something that they want to feature. And so a really clean, well styled image is going to do that for them.

Megan Breukelman:
And are there certain elements, in your opinion, that kind of make or break a style
d still life?

Kate Ignatowski:
Number one is good lighting. Absolutely. You can have, you know, the best stationery laid out perfectly. But if the lighting kind of falls flat, then it’s not going to be as good. Obviously, I feel like having a really good background is important, but also, you know, balancing shapes and colors and so that the layout is nice. And I do think that it’s important to develop a consistent style as a photographer or planner. I think that helps not necessarily get your wedding featured, but I think it just sort of becomes an integral part of your brand.

Megan Breukelman:
And speaking of brands, can you explain what makes locusts different than a typical styling product company?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. Well, first of all, the main thing is everything is travel friendly. I think about this a lot. I think about the entire process of like packing for a wedding, getting on an airplane or you’re going in a car, getting to the hotel. Like I think about this a lot. The whole system has to be travel friendly. But it’s not just that. You know, the product has to be really high quality. And the textiles I’m using have to be really beautiful. And I think that that combination is what makes the company and the products different.

Megan Breukelman:
And it’s so funny that you mentioned travel friendly because that’s the exact issue. Kenneth and I have actually run into with our current styling, Matt. We bought it thinking we were gonna bring it to weddings and so far we have brought it to zero weddings because we can’t actually travel well with it. So I’ve been really impressed with that element of locusts. And overall, I think the brand is an avenue with a lot of potential to diversify your income. And can you tell us a little bit about why or why not? Photographers should consider finding ways to diversify their income.

Kate Ignatowski:
Yes. Let’s see. I have so much to say on this topic. I’ll try to focus here. I think that for me, the reason that I was trying to diversify my income was that I wanted to travel less. I didn’t necessarily want to do less weddings or maybe just a little bit less. But the travel was the big thing for me, which I think is really different. Think a lot of people actually love traveling for weddings and that’s that’s their thing. But anyway, I guess you need to have a reason to want to do less weddings. Or maybe you just feel like you have grown your business to the point where you have extra time, you know, like when you’re starting out, maybe you are doing a lot of networking or you’re doing a lot of style shoots or whatever. And then you you reach a point where you you have a solid business and the time you used to spend growing it is now open. So you have time to fill. And then if you want to use that time to have extra income, then that’s another reason. I will say if you’re only looking for extra income, then, you know, I do think that starting another business in the wedding or photography industry is a great way. But I mean, it takes a lot to invest and grow a business. So if it’s only the money that you’re after, maybe get a part time job that inspires your photography business in a unique way, like work at a home furnishing store. That’s just like really visually inspiring or I don’t know. I think there’s a lot of ways to make extra money easier and starting another business. I also think it’s important to consider the impact that starting another business will have on your photography business. And I think there’s a huge scale. You know, I I’m kind of on the end of the scale of a long term in vestment and growth in my income and the expense of that on my family. And it took a toll on my photography business, but that was kind of a choice that I made because this is a long term thing for me. I think on the other end of the scale could be something that is easier to start up. It doesn’t take as much time away from your photography business. To me, I can’t think of what I don’t have an idea of what comes to mind for that. But maybe other places in that scale would be like doing workshops. I haven’t done them myself, but I’ve heard that they’re very time consuming, but could be a great way to grow your income. I guess what I’m trying to say is there’s a is a a scale. So think about before you start, think about what is your goal or you just trying to make extra money. Are you trying to do a five year plan to not do weddings anymore? If that’s the case, then maybe doing a long term investment like what I’ve done is important. Another thing I could add is that, you know, what I did was create a really unique product. But the time and resource investment that that took was pretty significant. But I had the benefit of I think it’s also going back to that product market. It is the reason that the business kind of grew so organically. If you have something that is easy to come up with or easy to make, maybe it’s going to take a lot longer to grow that business because it could be a saturated market. So those are a few thoughts I have on reasons to diversify your income.

Megan Breukelman:
And for those like you who do want to take the road less traveled, who have an amazing idea, they want to execute. Do you have any advice for up-and-coming photographers who may be looking to start a business of their own outside of their photography business?

Kate Ignatowski:
Yes, I have lots of advice. I think doing something that has never been done before is huge. I mean, try to find something that people need and hasn’t been made before, and that can be your own unique product. I think that starting there. And I really recommend start like finding a need. Don’t just, you know, find something that could be pretty or cute. I think that will fade quickly. Start with a need and then develop a product from there. Does that make sense?

Megan Breukelman:
Completely. Just making something and buying something is not is not what this is.

Kate Ignatowski:
No. Yes. So find a need and then or a problem and solve it. I think another thing is to stay focused. You know, once you find that get all the kinks worked out on it before you start to build it, like developing a whole portfolio products, I feel like that’s a mistake that I made. The styling surfaces, I was making them my own way longer than I should have. I should have focused on finding an outsource partner first before developing other products like my styling runners or the backdrop or some other things that I have been working on. I think that that making those all by myself, each one by hand, I think it held me back and I wish that I had just focused on getting that done inset before making other products. I wish I’d done that. So that would be some advice. I think, you know, if you’re in the long term and you’re really trying to build this whole new business, there’s going to be some hard times, there’s going to be setbacks. But if you can focus your eye on the horizon, kind of like don’t look down at the pile of rummage. Just keep looking forward. That’s gonna serve you well. You have patience. No worthwhile product is going to be developed quickly or easily. So noth
ing in life that is really beautiful or great was ever made quickly or easily. Be OK with passing on an idea. So this is actually something that happened to me. I mentioned that I had this, you know, whole that I was trying to fill. And I actually really wanted to start a wedding venue. When I was living in Richmond, I had a really real. Yeah. I had a great realtor that’s working with I had a business plan. I had like financing from a bank. And I was just looking for the right place. And there was actually this one property that I still think about, but I felt like it was too small and it wasn’t going to bring me the income that I needed to make it worth it. You know, and then we ended up having to move to Raleigh. So I kind of just. And then I had my second baby. So it all just sort of got put on the background. But if I had kind of like forced that, then I never would have made Lucas collection. And I feel like that ended up being a better fit for me right now. And I felt like I grew up in Richmond, so I knew it well. I I don’t know the Raleigh market as well. So another reason why I did it kind of looking to venues here. But I guess what I’m saying is be OK with letting something go because maybe there is something else better. And then my final piece of advice is to take care of yourself. You know, if you’re starting like a you’re going all in on a new business and you’re trying to keep your photography business going. I mean, that’s your resources are totally going to be maxed out. And I think it’s really important to take care of yourself. I know I did it for a long time. You know, I had I started of collection when I had a baby and a one year old, which is kind of crazy. And I just put everything into the business and I was putting everything into my family. And I really think I stress myself out to the breaking point. And in the last year, I have gotten a lot better at carving time out for myself for like running or yoga. And when you’re doing all these things, I think that it’s easy to say you don’t have time to go to yoga or don’t have time to go running or they don’t have time to sit down for five minutes and catch your breath. But I have to argue that, you know, if you don’t do those things, your business and your family is going to suffer. I have found that I’m so much more focused and innovative and at my business and patient with my family when I do take care of myself. So I think, you know, if you’re going in on making this new business, like take care of yourself and everything else, so be taking care of as well.

Megan Breukelman:
Well, thank you so much for being so candid. This has been a super insightful conversation, both about film photography for weddings and for diversifying your income. And I feel like we could go on forever on both topics. I have a million more questions. But for now, I guess, where can listeners find you?

Kate Ignatowski:
Sure. Well, you can find my shop online. It’s Locust L O C U S T collection dot com and on Instagram @locustcollection. Or, you know, feel free to email me at hello@locustcollection.com

Megan Breukelman:
Well, thank you so much, Kate. This has been great!

Kate Ignatowski:
Thank you Megan, this was so fun.

Megan Breukelman:
Thanks so much for tuning into the photo op podcast. If you liked this episode, I’d love for you to leave a review and let me know what you liked and what you want to hear more of. Also, head on over to the Facebook community and participate in some conversation with fellow photographers. If you want to reach me directly, feel free to DM me @meganbreukelman, which is linked in the show notes as well. Thanks again for listening. And I’ll see you in a flash.

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1/29/2020

POSTED

The Photo Opp Podcast – Episode 4: Film Wedding Photography, Diversifying Income and More | Guest: Kate Ignatowski at Locust Collection

  1. It was good to hear comments from someone now using film in weddings as well as digital.
    When digital came in I was shooting both until I was satisfied it was ok to do digital by itself. I discovered there were and still are pros and cons for both formats. Thanks for the podcast and interview. Geoff Thompson, Adelaide South Australia. Good to hear the Australian connection.

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